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Saturday, April 25, 2020 | History

1 edition of Biodegradation of Aircraft Deicing Fluid Components in Soil found in the catalog.

Biodegradation of Aircraft Deicing Fluid Components in Soil

Biodegradation of Aircraft Deicing Fluid Components in Soil

  • 323 Want to read
  • 14 Currently reading

Published by Storming Media .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • MED008000

  • The Physical Object
    FormatSpiral-bound
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL11848944M
    ISBN 101423545834
    ISBN 109781423545835

    TRB’s Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Web-Only Document 8: Alternative Aircraft Anti-Icing Formulations with Reduced Aquatic Toxicity and Biochemical Oxygen Demand explores the aquatic toxicity and biological oxygen demand state of the art, components, and promising alternative formulations of deicing and anti-icing products. Lab studies on biodegradation of aircraft deicing fluid in saturated soil; Surfactant-enhanced biodegradation of PCB's in bench-scale reactors; Column studies on effect of organic matter on transport of viruses in aquifers; Biofiltration for treatment of natural organic matter in drinking water supplies; Formation of disinfection by-products.


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Biodegradation of Aircraft Deicing Fluid Components in Soil Download PDF EPUB FB2

The abstract provided by the Pentagon follows: Aircraft de-icing fluids (ADFs) are used worldwide to ensure safe aircraft operations.

This research effort was conducted to analyze the biodegradation effects of two chemical components of ADFs, propylene glycol (PG) and tolyltriazole (TTA), in a high-clay : Baron W. Burke. Buy Evaluation of the Natural Biodegradation of Aircraft Deicing Fluid Components in Soils on FREE SHIPPING on qualified orders Evaluation of the Natural Biodegradation of Aircraft Deicing Fluid Components in Soils: Laura M.

Johnson: : Books. Buy Biodegradation of Deicing Agents in Various Soil Types on FREE SHIPPING on qualified orders Biodegradation of Deicing Agents in Various Soil Types: AnnMarie H. O'Malley: : Books.

Propylene glycol (PG) is a main component of aircraft deicing fluids and its extensive use in Northern airports is a source of soil and groundwater contamination. Glycol biodegradation was observed in soil at concentrations ranging from to mg/kg, suggesting that high levels of the deicing fluids are unlikely to be inhibitory to soil microorganisms.

All three glycols were readily degraded in soil at 8 and 25°C, regardless of whether the compounds were present singly or as a component of a by:   Propylene glycol (PG) is a main component of aircraft deicing fluids and its extensive use in Northern airports is a source of soil and groundwater contamination.

Bacterial consortia able to grow on PG as sole carbon and energy source were selected from soil samples taken along the runways of Oslo Airport Gardermoen site (Norway). DGGE analysis of enrichment cultures showed that PG Cited by: Biodegradation of aircraft deicing fluid (ADF) has been investigated under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

Operational difficulties such as sludge bulking and poor settleability were encountered in aerobic activated sludge treatment systems [5], [8]. Aerobic biodegradation in soil Cited by: 5. Comparative measures of the toxicity of component chemicals in aircraft deicing fluid.

Jeffrey S. Cornell the different additives increased the toxicity of ADF and decreased PG biodegradation rates. In enrichments of soil microorganisms acclimated to ADF, the MeBT component significantly decreased cell growth rates and yields, and inhibited Cited by: Deicing of a large commercial aircraft may require on the order of 2 to 4 m 3 of ADF and it has been estimated that a medium‐sized airport may use over m 3 of fluid over the entire winter season [2, 3].

In spite of the efforts of airline and airport managers to optimize ADF use, approximately 75 to 80% of the ADF applied to an aircraft Cited by: Many different types of aircraft deicing fluid, aircraft anti-icing fluid and airfield pavement deicer Airport deicing product components can also percolate into soil horizons.

The components can accumulate, degrade, or move into groundwater. Biodegradation is a process whereby organic molecules are broken down by microbial metabolism. During winter operations at airports, large amounts of organic deicing chemicals (DIC) accumulate beside the runways and infiltrate into the soil during spring.

To study the transport and degradation of DIC in the unsaturated zone, eight undisturbed soil cores were retrieved at Oslo airport, Norway, and installed as lysimeters at a nearby field by: Glycol biodegradation was observed in soil at concentrations ranging from to mg/kg, suggesting that high levels of the deicing fluids are unlikely to be inhibitory to soil microorganisms.

All three glycols were readily degraded in soil at 8 and 25 degrees C, regardless of whether the compounds were present singly or as a component of a mixture. Biodegradation of aircraft deicing fluids in soil at low temperatures Journal Article Klecka, G M ; Carpenter, C L ; Landenberger, B D - Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety; (United States) The effects of substrate concentration and temperature on the biodegradation of five different aircraft deicing fluids was examined in soil samples obtained from an area adjacent to an airport runway.

Aircraft de-icing fluids (ADF) are a source of water and soil pollution in airport sites. Propylene glycol (PG) is a main component in several commercial formulations of ADFs. Even though PG is biodegradable in soil, seasonal overloads may result in occasional groundwater contamination.

Feasibility studies for the biostimulation of PG degradation in soil have been carried out in soil Cited by: 3.

Comparative measures of the toxicity of component chemicals in aircraft deicing fluid. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry19 (6), DOI: /etc R Alzaga, A Mesas, L Ortiz, J.M Bayona. Characterization of organic compounds in soil and water affected by Cited by: SAFETY DATA SHEET OCTAFLO EF Type I Conc__Bulk Page 1 Substance key: CLTFGOEF1 Revision Date: 02/02/ SAE/AMS TY I Deicing Fluid Primary product use: De-icing.

Chemical family: Glycol SECTION 2. HAZARDS IDENTIFICATION Hazardous components Chemical name CAS-No. Concentration (% w/w). Evaluation of Activated Sludge for Biodegradation of Propylene Glycol as an Aircraft Deicing Fluid Article in Water Environment Research 86(4) April with 13 Reads How we measure 'reads'.

Soil biodegradation of propylene glycol based aircraft deicing fluids Journal Article. The discharge of untreated aircraft deicing fluid (ADF) wastes to surface water and stormwater collection systems is largely prohibited in the US, and many airports are searching for.

Ground deicing of aircraft is commonly performed in both commercial and general aviation. The fluids used in this operation are called deicing or anti-icing fluids.

The initials ADF (Aircraft Deicing Fluid), ADAF (Aircraft Deicer and Anti-icer Fluid) or AAF (Aircraft Anti-icing Fluid) are commonly used. Comparative measures of the toxicity of component chemicals in aircraft deicing fluid.

decreased PG biodegradation rates. In enrichments of soil microorganisms acclimated to ADF, the MeBT. Allied Signal has developed an innovative aircraft deicing system utilizing forced hot air in combination with a low-flow deicing fluid nozzle.

The system is configured similar to a conventional deicing truck with an operator bucket mounted on a boom and dual tanks Cited by: Unfortunately, this book can't be printed from the OpenBook. If you need to print pages from this book, we recommend downloading it as a PDF.

Visit to get more information about this book, to buy it in print, or to download it as a free PDF. Title: Soil biodegradation of propylene glycol based aircraft deicing fluids. Abstract. The discharge of untreated aircraft deicing fluid (ADF) wastes to surface water and stormwater collection systems is largely prohibited in the US, and many airports are searching for.

The air transport industry requires deicing agents to maintain flight operations in cold weather conditions. The main type of aircraft deicing fluid (ADF) being used is Type I, composed of a propylene glycol (PG)-base, water, and several by: 1.

Soil enrichment cultures, previously exposed to aircraft deicing com ponents, including MeBT, demonstrated a significant aerobic mineralization response by degrading up to 25 mg L -1 [U- 14 C]-5. Comparative measures of the toxicity of component chemicals in aircraft deicing fluid.

Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, 19 (6), – CrossRef Google ScholarCited by: 9. Keywords: Aircraft deicing fluid, benzotriazole, phytoremediation, wetlands, phytotransformation INTRODUCTION The removal of ice and snow and prevention of their accumulation on aircraft surfaces has been effectively achieved with the use of propylene glycol (PG) and ethylene glycol (EG) based aircraft deicer fluids (ADFs).Cited by: MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET Product Name: UCAR(TM) PG AIRCRAFT DEICING FLUID Effective Date: 07/17/ MSDS#: Page 3 of 14 Skin Contact Prolonged contact is essentially nonirritating to ed contact may cause flaking and softening of skin.

Material may be handled at elevated temperatures; contact with the heatedFile Size: KB. Product Safety Assessment: UCAR Ethylene Glycol Aircraft Deicing and Anti-Icing Fluids Revised: J The Dow Chemical Company Page 3 of 8 Type I Deicing Fluid 80% Type IV Anti-icing Fluid 20% Use of UCAR™EG-based Deicing and Anti-icing Fluids11 These products conform to Aerospace Material Specifications D, D, and E set by.

A combined soil amendment was tested in microcosm experiments with an aim to enhance the aerobic biodegradation of propylene glycol (PG)-based aircraft de-icing fluids during and following the infiltration of contaminated by: 7. The kinetics of anaerobic degradation of glycol-based Type I aircraft deicing fluids (ADFs) were characterized using suspended-growth fill-and-draw reactors.

Both Type I ADFs tested showed near-complete anaerobic by: Product Name: UCAR(TM) PG Aircraft Deicing Fluid Concentrate Issue Date: 10/19/ Page 2 of 8 Inhalation: At room temperature, exposure to vapor is minimal due to low volatility; vapor from heated material or mist may cause respiratory irritation and other effects.

Ingestion: Very low toxicity if swallowed. Harmful effects not anticipated from swallowing small. Evaluation of activated sludge for biodegradation of propylene glycol as an aircraft deicing fluid.

Delorit JD, Racz L. Aircraft deicing fluid used at airport facilities is often collected for treatment or disposal in order to prevent serious ecological threats to nearby surface by: 1.

Malakahmad, F.A. Lahin, W. Yee, Biodegradation of High-Strength Palm Oil Mill Effluent (POME) through Anaerobes Partitioning in an Integrated Baffled Reactor Inoculated with Anaerobic Pond Sludge, Water, Air, & Soil Pollution. () erization of an anaerobic baffled reactor treating dilute aircraft de-icing fluid and long term Cited by: Evaluation of the Use of Vegetation for Reducing the Environmental Impact of Deicing Agents Abstract This research project was conducted to evaluate the use of plants for reducing the environmental impact of aircraft deicers.

Significant quantities of ethylene glycol-based deicing fluids spill to the ground and inadvertently contaminate soil. Aircraft deicing fluid loadings as high as g chemical oxygen demand (COD)/L x d were sustainable in codigesters, whereas system fed only aircraft deicing fluid with nutrients and alkalinity achieved a loading of g COD/L x by: 4.

Successful treatment of dilute ethylene glycol based-aircraft de-icing fluid (ADF) was achieved using a four compartment, anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR). Three ADF concentrations (,and % v/v) were continuously fed at different hydrological retention times (HRTs; 24, 12, 6 and 3 h) with concomitant organic loading rates (OLRs Cited by: @article{osti_, title = {Effects of low temperature on the biodegradation of ethylene glycol and propylene glycol}, author = {Williams, J B and Blessing, R L}, abstractNote = {Ethylene glycol and propylene glycol are used in a variety of applications.

These compounds are well known to biodegrade readily at 20 C, which is the benchmark temperature for most biodegradation studies.

Rule for Aircraft Deicing Effluent (Ap ) on spent aircraft deicing fluid and stormwater collection and treatment must be considered. Within the context of this final rule, an Airport must review its deicing operations including spraying, collection, storage, and File Size: KB.

Bioremediation of Aircraft Deicing Fluids (Glycol) at Airports. This report describes the work done to determine the effectiveness of various aerobic bioremediation techniques for reducing the biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) of aircraft deicing fluid by: 4.

A fluid meeting this specification is unique to the manufacturer and may be adversely affected by mixing with other aircraft deicing/anti-icing fluids.

Adverse effects may also result from the mixing of Glycol (Conventional and Non- Conventional) based and Non-Glycol based aircraft deicing/anti-icing fluids and should be tested prior to use.apron and service areas (1). Consequently, deicing or anti-icing of aircraft and runways are the key components in assuring cold weather aircraft safety, with human safety being an overriding concern at most airports.

Airport deicing and anti-icing practices fall into two general categories: aircraft .components of ethylene glycol-based fluids used at airports to protect the flying public from accidents related to solid precipitation on aircraft and runways.

Specifically,ethylene glycol-based fluids are applied to aircraft and runways both to remove snow and ice (deicing) and to prevent snow and ice from reforming (anti-icing).